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Cees Sliedrecht Art Class

Cees draws and paints unique images of life as it exists or happens around him. He uses both traditional and contemporary styles in a unique blend of energy, life, light, movement, texture, and emotion. Many of his paintings contain a deeper meaning and show multi-layered facets, challenging the viewer to examine the artwork in greater detail.

Cees believes that an ideal artwork must appear to have a life of its own. It should respond to the viewer’s mood and emotions and continue to offer change variety and engagement.

cees-sliedrecht-painting
Ballerinas waiting to be called – pen and watercolour

Art workshop details

11 Reasons Why You Should Attend an Art Workshop.

Most people are curious about taking an art workshop. We ponder it over and over in our heads and before the decision is made, several thoughts enter our minds.

“Is it really worth it?”
” When will I ever have the time?”
“I’m not good enough.”
“I could never afford it.”
“I could never paint like that.”
“I can learn just as much from videos and books.”
“I don’t really need the help.”
“This is just a hobby to pass the time.”
Just so you know, some of those same instructors you admire had the same thoughts before they took their first workshop and before they became serious about their art.
Sometimes you don’t choose art, it chooses you. Taking the first step can be what makes all of the difference.
There are many ways to learn a new medium or technique with all of the books, DVDs, magazines, and online classes, you would hardly ever have to leave your house. But, none of those less interactive sources will ever compare to attending live art workshops. With a varied list of mediums and tutors available, you can most likely find something just right for you here. Then, make your arrangements with that workshop in mind.

Benefits of Painting.

1. Communication

Art makes us more human; it helps us to communicate in a different, personal language. This is a great benefit for all people and mainly for those who have conditions with a lack of communication or problems expressing themselves such as shyness, autism and other disabilities.

2. Therapy

Painting is an individual activity even in the workshop or classroom; the student enters his/her own world, a world which is full of possibilities. The stimulus of the creative mind allows the student to positively isolate from reality, which provides a mental rest that lowers stress and generates relaxation and happy feelings. This is especially significant for people with aggression or nervousness conditions.

3. Self-esteem

Working in a non-competitive, relaxed environment (the teacher plays a major role here) will enable the student to come closer to greater personal achievements; this will strengthen his/her individuality and self-esteem. This is especially significant for people with co-dependency, traumatic conditions and elderly people who need activities that can strengthen their autonomy.

 

4. Mobility

Learning to hold and handle a brush and/or pencil will help regulate the hand movements and stimulate brain connections at the same time the skill is being developed. In elderly people, painting helps them strengthen their fine motor skill.

5. Concentration and Healing

People who immerse themselves several hours painting or creating something enter a purer area, in a very strong state of concentration; they abstract themselves from their surroundings and time passes by without noticing it. Physical pains fade away; it is almost like entering another dimension without leaving our body.  This is a state similar to that achieved through praying, meditation, music, aromatherapy, and being in love. There have been cases of miraculous temporary healing in painters, musicians who, when in this state, are able to move their atrophied hands or don´t feel pain when creating or executing. Painters Renoir and Gauguin and musician Andrés Segovia are examples of this.

People who immerse themselves several hours painting or creating something enter a purer area, in a very strong state of concentration; they abstract themselves from their surroundings and time passes by without noticing it. Physical pains fade away; it is almost like entering another dimension without leaving our body.  This is a state similar to that achieved through praying, meditation, music, aromatherapy, and being in love. There have been cases of miraculous temporary healing in painters, musicians who, when in this state, are able to move their atrophied hands or don´t feel pain when creating or executing. Painters Renoir and Gauguin and musician Andrés Segovia are examples of this.

6. Mental Health

Painting helps us get distracted from our problems; it helps us take anguish out and transform it into something nice, which is given a title. This helps us identify the feelings and increase our expression capabilities. This is especially significant for people with nervousness, mental conditions (like schizophrenia) or people going through an emotional imbalance like a break-up who use the visual expression to achieve catharsis. Adults who learn to paint fight the fear to confront themselves, learn to persevere and are encouraged to create something that belongs only to them, a personal project, unique and enormously satisfying.

7. Brain Activity

Drawing and painting stimulate both the left and right brain hemispheres. The first deals with the rational, logic elements and the second one maximises our creativity and emotions. Painting is helpful during the growth and development stages of children as well as in adulthood when it is very valuable to fight illnesses like Alzheimer. Painting boosts imagination; the imagination of Alzheimer patients, whose memory starts to vanish, is strengthened.

8. Emotional Intelligence

Emotions are part of the creative world we all have inside. Making those emotions flow through painting helps create harmony between the heart and mind, which leads us to experiment happiness, love, empathy and peace. Within this chaotic world we live, the visualization and relaxation that we obtain through painting are tools that in the long run, benefit our emotional, organic, energetic and spiritual being.

9. Art Appreciation

Practice, understand and talk about art creates a better understanding of it. Individuals see themselves reflected and motivated by the work of others, which also allows us to be a receptor of this type of communication, which dates back to the beginning of human history.

10. Culture

The knowledge that a person can achieve when learning to paint enables him/her to understand human history through art.

11. But more importantly, it’s Fun

Learning how to paint has all the benefits of good entertainment: we laugh, socialize, learn something new, feel motivated to finish what we start, appreciate nature and feel passion for something good.

Learning how to paint has all the benefits of good entertainment: we laugh, socialize, learn something new, feel motivated to finish what we start, appreciate nature and feel passion for something good.
So it’s up to you, for your health, your amusement or personal goal, let’s paint!

Look at the Tutors and Mediums we offer.

 

Art workshops for 2018

Book your place in one of these fantastic visual art classes.

Norman Lindsay and a quick “Magic” quiz

Norman Alfred William Lindsay (22 February 1879 – 21 November 1969) was an Australian artist, etcher, sculptor, writer, editorial cartoonist, scale modeller, and an accomplished amateur boxer.

Lindsay is widely regarded as one of Australia’s greatest artists, producing a vast body of work in different media, including pen drawing, etching, watercolour, oil and sculptures in concrete and bronze.

A large body of his work is housed in his former home at Faulconbridge, New South Wales, now the Norman Lindsay Gallery and Museum, and many works reside in private and corporate collections. His art continues to climb in value today. In 2002, a record price was attained for his oil painting Spring’s Innocence, which sold to the National Gallery of Victoria for A$333,900.

Springs Innocence

His frank and sumptuous nudes were highly controversial. In 1940, Soady took sixteen crates of paintings, drawings and etchings to the U.S. to protect them from the war. Unfortunately, they were discovered when the train they were on caught fire and were impounded and subsequently burned as pornography by American officials. Soady’s older brother Lionel remembers Lindsay’s reaction: “Don’t worry, I’ll do more.”

Lindsay’s creative output was vast, his energy enormous. Several eyewitness accounts tell of his working practices in the 1920s. He would wake early and produce a watercolour before breakfast, then by mid-morning, he would be in his etching studio where he would work until late afternoon. He would work on a concrete sculpture in the garden during the afternoon and in the evening write a new chapter for whatever novel he was working on at the time.

One of the many sculptures in the Faulconbridge grounds.

As a break, he would work on a model ship some days. He was highly inventive, melting down the lead casings of oil paint tubes to use for the figures on his model ships, made a large easel using a door, carved and decorated furniture, designed and built chairs, created garden planters, Roman columns and built his own additions to the Faulconbridge property.

The Faulconbridge homestead and part of the gardens with a pond and fountain

My first encounter of Norman Lindsay and I would hazard a guess that this is the case for most Australian children was his book The Magic Pudding. It is said that Norman wrote this book to settle an argument. A friend of Lindsay’s said that children like to read about fairies, while Lindsay asserted that they would rather read about food and fighting.

The Magic Pudding cover illustration

The Magic Pudding: Being The Adventures of Bunyip Bluegum and his friends Bill Barnacle and Sam Sawnoffis an Australian children’s book written and illustrated by Norman Lindsay. It is a comic fantasy and a classic of Australian children’s literature.

The story is set in Australia with humans mixing with animals. It tells of a magic pudding named Albert which, no matter how often it is eaten, always reforms in order to be eaten again. It is owned by three companions who must defend it against Pudding Thieves who want it for themselves.

The book is divided into four “slices” instead of chapters. There are many short songs interspersed throughout the text, varying from stories told in rhyme to descriptions of a character’s mood or behaviour, and verses of an ongoing sea song.

I have put together a very short quiz about this book. See how much you remember from your childhood. (Try not to use the interwebs to look up answers, it’s more fun that way).

 

A FEW FUN FACTS AND TRIVIA ABOUT FAMOUS ARTISTS

I don’t know about you, but little facts and trivia about artists make them seem more human to me.  Here are some interesting things I have found while scouring the interwebs.

  • DaVinci became a vegetarian for moral reasons. He even bought caged birds at outdoor markets and set them free.
  • Caravaggio murdered a man, fled Rome and eventually ended up in Malta, where he was knighted.
DAVID AND GOLIATH by Caravaggio. The head of Goliath is a self-portrait.
  • The Pieta is the only work Michelangelo ever signed.  While delivering it, he overheard someone remark that he couldn’t have done that – he was too young.  He went back that night and signed it.  He was 23 at the time.
The Pieta by Michaelangelo.
  • Rembrandt filed for bankruptcy.
  • Picasso had his first art show at age 13 – showing paintings in the back of an umbrella store.  In his 90th year, he produced 200 paintings.
  • Duchamp deliberately accumulated dust to use in his artwork. He also perfected a system of winning at roulette and was on the French team at the International Chess Olympiads.  He eventually married Matisse’s ex-wife.
  • Matisse’s painting LeBateau hung upside down for 46 days at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

 

 

La Bateau by Matisse – right way up.
  • Paul Gaugin worked on the Panama Canal.
  • Rodin died of frostbite.
  • George Braque was the first living artist to be exhibited at The Louvre.
  • There is a silhouette or a self-portrait of Dali in all his paintings.
  • It is said Da Vinci invented high heels.

Anything you want to add?