Tag Archives: drawing

11 Reasons Why You Should Attend an Art Workshop.

Most people are curious about taking an art workshop. We ponder it over and over in our heads and before the decision is made, several thoughts enter our minds.

“Is it really worth it?”
” When will I ever have the time?”
“I’m not good enough.”
“I could never afford it.”
“I could never paint like that.”
“I can learn just as much from videos and books.”
“I don’t really need the help.”
“This is just a hobby to pass the time.”
Just so you know, some of those same instructors you admire had the same thoughts before they took their first workshop and before they became serious about their art.
Sometimes you don’t choose art, it chooses you. Taking the first step can be what makes all of the difference.
There are many ways to learn a new medium or technique with all of the books, DVDs, magazines, and online classes, you would hardly ever have to leave your house. But, none of those less interactive sources will ever compare to attending live art workshops. With a varied list of mediums and tutors available, you can most likely find something just right for you here. Then, make your arrangements with that workshop in mind.

Benefits of Painting.

1. Communication

Art makes us more human; it helps us to communicate in a different, personal language. This is a great benefit for all people and mainly for those who have conditions with a lack of communication or problems expressing themselves such as shyness, autism and other disabilities.

2. Therapy

Painting is an individual activity even in the workshop or classroom; the student enters his/her own world, a world which is full of possibilities. The stimulus of the creative mind allows the student to positively isolate from reality, which provides a mental rest that lowers stress and generates relaxation and happy feelings. This is especially significant for people with aggression or nervousness conditions.

3. Self-esteem

Working in a non-competitive, relaxed environment (the teacher plays a major role here) will enable the student to come closer to greater personal achievements; this will strengthen his/her individuality and self-esteem. This is especially significant for people with co-dependency, traumatic conditions and elderly people who need activities that can strengthen their autonomy.

 

4. Mobility

Learning to hold and handle a brush and/or pencil will help regulate the hand movements and stimulate brain connections at the same time the skill is being developed. In elderly people, painting helps them strengthen their fine motor skill.

5. Concentration and Healing

People who immerse themselves several hours painting or creating something enter a purer area, in a very strong state of concentration; they abstract themselves from their surroundings and time passes by without noticing it. Physical pains fade away; it is almost like entering another dimension without leaving our body.  This is a state similar to that achieved through praying, meditation, music, aromatherapy, and being in love. There have been cases of miraculous temporary healing in painters, musicians who, when in this state, are able to move their atrophied hands or don´t feel pain when creating or executing. Painters Renoir and Gauguin and musician Andrés Segovia are examples of this.

People who immerse themselves several hours painting or creating something enter a purer area, in a very strong state of concentration; they abstract themselves from their surroundings and time passes by without noticing it. Physical pains fade away; it is almost like entering another dimension without leaving our body.  This is a state similar to that achieved through praying, meditation, music, aromatherapy, and being in love. There have been cases of miraculous temporary healing in painters, musicians who, when in this state, are able to move their atrophied hands or don´t feel pain when creating or executing. Painters Renoir and Gauguin and musician Andrés Segovia are examples of this.

6. Mental Health

Painting helps us get distracted from our problems; it helps us take anguish out and transform it into something nice, which is given a title. This helps us identify the feelings and increase our expression capabilities. This is especially significant for people with nervousness, mental conditions (like schizophrenia) or people going through an emotional imbalance like a break-up who use the visual expression to achieve catharsis. Adults who learn to paint fight the fear to confront themselves, learn to persevere and are encouraged to create something that belongs only to them, a personal project, unique and enormously satisfying.

7. Brain Activity

Drawing and painting stimulate both the left and right brain hemispheres. The first deals with the rational, logic elements and the second one maximises our creativity and emotions. Painting is helpful during the growth and development stages of children as well as in adulthood when it is very valuable to fight illnesses like Alzheimer. Painting boosts imagination; the imagination of Alzheimer patients, whose memory starts to vanish, is strengthened.

8. Emotional Intelligence

Emotions are part of the creative world we all have inside. Making those emotions flow through painting helps create harmony between the heart and mind, which leads us to experiment happiness, love, empathy and peace. Within this chaotic world we live, the visualization and relaxation that we obtain through painting are tools that in the long run, benefit our emotional, organic, energetic and spiritual being.

9. Art Appreciation

Practice, understand and talk about art creates a better understanding of it. Individuals see themselves reflected and motivated by the work of others, which also allows us to be a receptor of this type of communication, which dates back to the beginning of human history.

10. Culture

The knowledge that a person can achieve when learning to paint enables him/her to understand human history through art.

11. But more importantly, it’s Fun

Learning how to paint has all the benefits of good entertainment: we laugh, socialize, learn something new, feel motivated to finish what we start, appreciate nature and feel passion for something good.

Learning how to paint has all the benefits of good entertainment: we laugh, socialize, learn something new, feel motivated to finish what we start, appreciate nature and feel passion for something good.
So it’s up to you, for your health, your amusement or personal goal, let’s paint!

Look at the Tutors and Mediums we offer.

 

Why colouring isn’t just for kids.

It’s a quiet winter afternoon. The light falls softly on the colouring book. Crayons are scattered on the coffee table. Colours are spreading slowly across the mandala she’s colouring in.

Is this you? An adult involved in an activity we associate with children.

You are not alone. Colouring in has taken off in a big way amongst adults across the world, including highly stressed executives. The activity is being hailed as therapeutic for anxiety and stress and is even promoted by psychologists.

Psychologist and neuroscientist Dr Stan Rodski from Melbourne Australia has launched his own colouring books for his patients after noticing how children relax when they colour in. He was having difficulties with getting his corporate clients to practice relaxation techniques like breathing, meditation or yoga. He also conducted a number of research studies, measuring changes in heart rate and brainwaves that showed colouring in lead to positive neurological responses and improved executives’ ability to manage stress.

Does the kind of image you colour in matter? It seems that certain patterns are more conducive to reducing stress.

Dr Rodski favours patterns and shapes in his books rather than defined pictures or scenes. According to him, images that incorporate repetition, pattern and detail give the best results.

Colouring in mandalas seems to be especially effective in reducing stress levels. The symmetrical form of the mandala with its repeating patterns and complexity is said to bring about a state similar to meditation.

A study by Nancy A. Curry and Tim Kasser examined the effectiveness of different types of art activities in the reduction of anxiety and found that colouring in a mandala reduced anxiety levels of participants significantly.

Carl Jung practised drawing and painting mandalas for many years. He saw them as symbols of the Self. Having his patients create mandalas became one of the tools he used in his psychiatric practice.

So we have proof that colouring in, and specifically focusing on complicated patterns help us to relieve stress, to relax and forget about our woes, but why? Why is it such a huge hit with adults? Isn’t it also a bit silly? Grown men in suits sitting at their desks with colouring books and crayons? Are women having colouring in parties?

Is there a secret reward that keeps adults hooked on this childhood activity? Apart from the fact that that aspect might very well be why we enjoy it so much – we get to be kids again.

I think Julie Beck expresses the pleasing and rewarding effect of coloring in the best: “It takes a good while to color one of these things in completely—a few hours, I’d say—and there’s something very satisfying about watching the color slowly spread across the page, about seeing your thought and effort create a tangible, pretty thing at a reasonable, predictable pace. This rarely happens in life.”

Life is short, Art is long

Conquer those fears or learn something new. With Australia’s best visual arts tutors to guide and nourish your creativity, your art will shine.

19 fabulous workshops tutored by Australia’s best.

Honeyeaters and Flowering Gum in Pencil, Colour Pencil and Graphite

Janet Matthews art class

Janet will show students the techniques needed to fully explore colour pencil and graphite.  The subject of this workshop will be honeyeaters and Flowering Gum.  Each student will design their own artwork for completion, giving each student the chance to be simple or complex in their design.

More information.

Beginners Workshop in Pencil & Graphite Pencil

MARGARET HASTIE

This workshop will introduce the fundamentals of botanical drawing and progress to painting in watercolour.  Initially, the focus will be on accuracy and observation in order to train the eye to see what is there, not what the mind thinks is there. We will begin by drawing botanical subjects in graphite pencil, concentrating on the controlled line, shading, tonal contrast and perspective (including foreshortening).After drawing simple plant structures we will gradually build up to more complicated subject matter. Botanical samples will be provided.

More Information

Sketching and Watercolour painting art class

With Malcolm Carver.

Imagine this scenario: a feeling of despondency starting the week saying, ‘I can’t draw to save my life’…. or ‘I wasn’t born with this skill’ … to the sense of achievement, fulfilment and exhilaration by the end of the week when you discover that you can. Most students just need encouragement. Drawing, of course, is fundamental to all painting skills like the skeletal frame is to the human body. Painting is drawing with a brush!

Book Now.

THE IMPORTANCE OF TIMING IN WATERCOLOUR

In this exciting workshop,

there will be lots of step by step demonstrations explaining the watercolour process, the importance of the first wash, correct transparency, a full explanation of correct timing before you move onto the next wash, in-depth colour theory, tone drawing and composition.

Book now

Fiona Craig – Painting Vibrant Flowers in Oils

Fiona Craig paints floral, still life and landscapes in oils, watercolours, pastels and mixed media.

This workshop will cover techniques that are useful for rendering flowers in the medium of oil paints on canvas or board. It aims at the achievement of vibrant artworks that convey a sense of light, shadow and sculptural form.

Testimonial, Malcolm Carver’s 2017 workshop.

It was entertaining and motivating. Not a minute was wasted. So much drawing, painting and learning were covered in the 5 days. Malcolm’s approach to painting in watercolour, particularly involving the drawing and getting the tone right, were very inspiring.

I loved every minute of it and believe that I now have a much better understanding of not just painting watercolour, but also composing a picture, drawing and the whole process of completing a successful artwork that I am pleased with. Diane